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Archive for the ‘Conference’ Category

Three Days International Conference on Mahabharta

13-15 February, 2020

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New Doc 2019-11-26 17.21.26

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INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON “RELEVANCE OF BUDDHISM IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD”

30th, 31st March & 1st April, 2020

SILVER JUBILEE YEAR (1994 – 2019)

VENUE: SATYAWATI COLLEGE AUDITORIUM (UNIVERSITY OF DELHI) ORGANIZED BY DEPARTMENT OF BUDDHIST STUDIES SATYAWATI COLLEGE (EVENING) ASHOK VIHAR, PHASE-3 UNIVERSITY OF DELHI, DELHI-110052 In Collaboration with Akhil Bhartiya Ihihaas Sankalan Yojna

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अन्तर्राष्ट्रीय संगोष्ठी

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International Seminar
On
Decriminalization of Indian Queer: Socio-Cultural, Political and Legal Concerns
Dates: 20-22 April, 2020
Convened by
Dr Kaustav Chakraborty, Department of English, Southfield (Loreto) College,
Darjeeling-734101

Concept-Note
The queer citizens of India witnessed a historic moment on 6 September 2018 when a five-judge panel of the Supreme Court of India declared that criminalizing queers for any consensual relationship is, in the words of the-then Chief Justice of India, “irrational, arbitrary and indefensible”. Both Chief Justice Dipak Misra and Justice A M Khanwilkar recognized that “sexual autonomy” as an “important pillar” is an “insegregable facet of individual liberty”. “History owes an apology to the members of this community and their families, for the delay in providing redressal for the ignominy and ostracism they have suffered… The members of this community were compelled to live a life full of fear of reprisal and persecution. This was on account of the ignorance of the majority to recognise that homosexuality is a completely natural condition, part of a range of human sexuality,” observed Justice Indu Malhotra.
The civilizational culture that we call Indian has always been an inclusive one. Scholars like Ruth Vanita, Saleem Kidwai, Giti Thadani, Vinay Lal, Mrinalini Sinha and many others have already elucidated how with the domination of the European hypermasculinity, non heteronormativity has gradually been otherised – a trend that has been eventually internalized and reproduced in postcolonial India. Hence, although queer phobia is a major anxiety in contemporary India, the decriminalizing of non conformist sexuality has to be appraised as a decolonizing attempt of the Indian judiciary.
The Supreme Court Judgment while reading down Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code asserted that constitutional rights need to be safeguarded and assured over majoritarian ethos. Decriminalization is a very significant but not sufficient move towards ensuring the equality of all Indian queer citizens and their right to live with dignity. Justice D Y Chandrachud has acknowledged that decriminalization is the “first step” for the queer community towards “an equal participation of citizenship and an equal enjoyment of living”. The most acute challenge before the decriminalized queer Indian people is that of acceptability by the mass, because a large section of Indians have internalized the colonial homophobia. Hence, sensitizing the common people regarding the queer ‘natural’ identity as well as documentation of the instances of inclusion of the queer in the Indian socio-cultural tradition needs to be initiated strategically. Moreover, in the political domain discussion has to be started regarding the recognition of the civil rights of the queer community. To some extent debates and discussion have been taking place regarding the civil rights of the transgender people, but no such initiatives can be seen regarding the gay, lesbian and bisexual people. In this context, it is also important to realize that although LGBTQ is seen as an assemblage, there are also distinct issues that are specifically related to the gay, lesbian and bisexual. Hence policy has to be framed/amended keeping in mind the queer as a collective as well as the lesbians, gays, transsexuals and bisexuals, as distinctive identities. One also needs to address the concerns of the asexual people. Most importantly, legal provisions have to be framed in order to acknowledge and safeguard the rights of these otherised people. Finally, since the entire queer movement for decriminalizing has been mostly based on the metro cities and urban India, strategies need to be framed in order to address the severe marginalization of the queer people of the rural and mofussil India. The so called queer ‘pride’ walks have been conducted in the urban areas and for most of the rural and mofussil Indians, queer still remains just as a worrying symbol of people with HIV – that is, a diseased individual. Hence, the next phase of the queer movement should focus on committing to the non-urban India and addressing the ‘multiply marginalized’ like the rural and mofussil queer individuals, Dalit queer, queer with disabilities or those from the minority communities.
The seminar aspires to bring together the academicians, scholars, creative personalities, activists, social workers, administrators and legal experts to address the requirements of the decriminalized queer citizens of India in the process of asserting their identity and to frame guidelines for the policymakers regarding the eradication of homophobia through socio-cultural, political and legal reforms. These are the specific questions that the seminar wants to address: What kind of impact has the decriminalization created on the queer community and on the ongoing theoretical debates on queer questions in India and across the world? How is the ‘mainstream’ reacting to the decriminalization? What are the major expectations of the decriminalized queer community from the nation and the countrymen? How can the large homophobic section of the citizens be provided with proper orientation so that the aspirations of the marginalized queer community get fulfilled? What should be the role of academia in addressing the queer concerns emerging in the post 377 verdict state of affairs? How should the NGOs be involved to bridge the gap between the straight and the queer? How to explore and analyze the everyday life of queers and reflect on the socio-cultural and economic ground complexities of this group of individuals or sections of society? What socio-cultural, political and legal frameworks need to be worked upon to bring the queerphobia to an end?
The feminist and the Dalit movements in India have provided us with the models of gradual progression in resisting discrimination. After the decriminalization comes to the ‘second wave’ of struggle against social taboos and for policy reformations towards the granting of the civil and political rights to the queer Indian community. It is hoped that this seminar as a queer ‘round table’ would eventually give birth to an intimate ‘queer Indian collective’ so that the future course of actions can be chalked out and the battle against discrimination can be strategically continued towards success.

The seminar would invite speakers to address issues related to the following sub-themes:

· Impact of the decriminalization on the queer community
· Aspirations of the decriminalized Indian queer: Re-assessing the current and historical theoretical debates; empirical work illustrating the everyday complexities of Indian queers.
· Responses of the ‘mainstream’ regarding the decriminalizing of the queer
· Making the queer visible in Socio-cultural domain: instances of Historical inclusion; queer and indigeneity; literary and folk representations; depiction in various forms of art, architecture and cinema
· Equally but differently Oppressed: Distinct Problems faced by the gays, lesbians, transsexuals and bisexuals in India; the Western categories of queer vis-à-vis the Indian construction of sexuality based identities like ‘Kinnar’, ‘Jogta’, ‘Jogti’, ‘Shiv-shakthis’ ‘Hijra’, ‘Aravani’, ‘Kothi’, ‘Napunsak’ etc.
· Multiple marginalizations: Addressing the concerns of the queers of rural and mofussil India, queer people with disabilities, Dalit queer, queer individuals of the minority communities, asexual individuals etc.
· Role of the government and nongovernmental organizations in eradicating homophobia
· The ‘Second Wave’: Future Plan of actions for a vibrant queer movement in India towards socio-cultural, political and legal reforms; suggestions for policy formations/ amendments.

CALL FOR PAPERS

A limited number of participants will be invited for the Seminar. Those interested in participating should send -by email-an abstract of 500 words of the proposed paper along with their brief C.V. (of around 200 words) to:
1. Dr Kaustav Chakraborty, Department of English, Southfield (Loreto) College, Darjeeling-734101 Email: kaustavchakraborty2011@gmail.com

With a copy to:
2. Ms. Ritika Sharma
Academic Resource Officer, Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Rashtrapati Nivas, Shimla- 171005 Tel: 0177-2831385 Email: aro@iias.ac.in
The last date for submission of abstract (500 words) is 2nd February 2020 till 12:00 midnight. The Institute intends to send Invitation letters to selected participants by March 2020. It is the policy of the Institute to publish the papers not proceedings of the seminars it organizes. Hence, all invited participants will be expected to submit complete papers (English or Hindi), hitherto unpublished and original, with citations in place, along with a reference section, to the Academic Resource Officer, Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla– 171005 by 5th April 2020. IIAS, Shimla will be glad to extend its hospitality (free hospitality is provided only to the seminar participant) during the seminar period and is willing to reimburse, if required, rail or air travel expenses from the place of current residence in India, or the port of arrival in India, and back.
Note: Plagiarism is a serious academic offence and the Institute reserves the right to cancel the selection/participation of a candidate found guilty at any stage

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Decriminalization of Indian Queer: Socio-Cultural, Political and Legal Concerns

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Indian Council of Cultural Relations (ICCR, New Delhi) and Indian Institute of Advanced Study (IIAS, Shimla)
Re-Examining Indology: Retrospect and Prospect

Overview:
Every civilization has an inbuilt mechanism to recollect and interpret its past which is a storehouse of its history and culture. This gives a sense of continuity on the basis of which traditions are built. Long before the emergence of Indology as a colonial discipline in 18th century India had her own intellectual traditions of self-recollection, self-identification, and self-representation. These traditions were abounding with foundational texts inquiring into everything-from astronomy and grammar to the nature of ultimate reality-and developing appropriate knowledge systems for almost all aspects of human life. These texts were continuously reflected and commented upon by a chain of commentaries in various forms along with history (Itihāsa) as recollected, chronicled, and retold through various means not to speak of myth and kāvya traditions. Without bearing any formal disciplinary nomenclature such as Indology, this vibrant and living engagement with the past—a realization of its own civilizational-self (ātma-bodh)—was derived from an ‘internalist’ perspective of its agency which was an integral part of those living traditions.

Classical Indology was a result of colonial processes, centuries after the purported European ‘discovery’ of the non-European world. In those centuries preceding colonialism, much knowledge was already appropriated from India ranging from calculus to astronomy and navigation. Indology totally neglected these earlier appropriations and sought to reduce the ancient civilization of India to a limited body of knowledge for the purposes of dominating it and ruling it. This body of knowledge developed out of the orientalist, missionary and the colonial interests of European scholarship in India which in turn was influenced by the overall European attempt at ‘othering’ the Indian civilization as was done with Amerindians and Africans.
The Eurocentric body of knowledge about Indian civilization in its classical era did exhibit some of the best shining examples of thorough and painstaking scholarship in translating some of the key texts of Indian civilization (e.g. William Jones, Henry Thomas Colebrooke, Max Müller and others) but it was nonetheless overshadowed in terms of its implicit presuppositions such as the division between Occident and Orient, the Aryan invasion theory, and the superiority
of European civilization. As subtexts to these assumptions, Indian civilization was portrayed as mythical, esoteric and other-worldly, with no sense of history, devoid of scientific temper, incapable of developing theoretical and practical sciences.

Pertinent Questions:
How should Indian scholars contribute to the generation of a new Indology in partnership with their confreres in the global arena in a manner which is true to the spirit and substance of India’s rich, varied and living cultural heritage? What would be the appropriate epistemological underpinning of such a reconstructed Bhārat-Vidyā that could serve as a vehicle to understand India’s civilizational self?
Focusing on these questions, Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR, New Delhi) and Indian Institute of Advanced Study (IIAS, Shimla) propose to organize an International Seminar to address some of the methodological, archaeological, historical, sociological, and philosophical issues involved in understanding the complexities of Indian society with particular attention to desiderata including the appropriate identification and use of source materials, knowledge systems, as well as methods of translation and interpretation.

Objectives of the Seminar:
• to focus on contemporary value/relevance of Indological research
• to take forward some major debates in Indology
• to stress inter-disciplinary potential of Indology

Issues to be discussed
• Pre-indological appropriation of Indian knowledge
• Contemporary relevance of Indian Gaṇita (Mathematics), Ayurveda (Medicine), Darśansāstra (Philosophy), and Vijñāna (Science).
• Indian concept of State

Date: March, 13,14,15, 2020.
Venue: Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla, India.

Call for Papers:

A limited number of participants will be invited for the Seminar. Those interested in participating should send (preferably by email) an abstract (500 words) of the proposed paper along with their brief bio of around 200 words to:

1. Professor Sharad Deshpande Former Professor and Head, Department of Philosophy, University of Pune email ID sharad.unipune@gmail.com

2. Professor C K Raju, Tagore Fellow, IIAS Shimla Email: ckr@ckraju.net
With a copy to:

3. Ms. Ritika Sharma
Academic Resource Officer,
Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla.
Tel: 0177-2831385 Email: aro@iias.ac.in
The last date for submission of abstract (500 words) is 13th January 2020, till 12:00 midnight. The Institute intends to send Invitation letters to selected participants by February 2020. It is the policy of the Institute to publish the papers not proceedings of the seminars it organizes. Hence, all invited participants will be expected to submit complete papers (English or Hindi), hitherto unpublished and original, with citations in place, along with a reference section, to the Academic Resource Officer, Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla– 171005 by 1st March 2020. IIAS, Shimla will be glad to extend its hospitality (free hospitality is provided only to the seminar participant) during the seminar period and is willing to reimburse, if required, rail or air travel expenses from the place of current residence in India, or the port of arrival in India, and back.

Note: Plagiarism is a serious academic offense and the Institute reserves the right to cancel the selection/participation of a candidate found guilty at any stage.

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Re-Examining Indology: Emerging Contours

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Department of Sanskrit,

Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi, India

with the collaboration of Indian Council for Philosophical Research (ICPR) and Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts (IGNCA) organises

THREE DAY INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE on THE INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS OF KASHMIR

14, 15 & 16 February, 2020 (Friday, Saturday & Sunday)

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International Kashmir Confrence_Jamia

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National Conference on “Understanding Disability and Mental Health Towards Inclusion & Empowerment”

16-17 January 2020

AN INTROSPECTION

The radical shift in thinking about disability from a social welfare perspective to a human rights perspective is the result of the landmark legislation of 2016. The Rights of Persons with Disability Act stresses nondiscrimination, full participation and effective inclusion in every aspect of life. Its strongly emphasizes the need of understanding the value of differences and acceptance of disabilities as part of human diversity. It advocates accessibility, gender equality and facilitation of evolving capacities of children with disabilities and co morbid conditions. The emergence of comprehensive mental health needs is well articulated in the current national research and data. Most of these conditions remain invisible and get stigmatized, unnoticed or undetected. The confluence of disability, mental health needs with the vibrant efforts towards inclusion and empowerment brings forth a remarkable opportunity to study and support human exceptionality. This unique conference aims to bridge the gap in advocacy, early identification of mental illness and disability, an march towards strategic planning and appraisal of good practices. Such an approach shall embark on a people first perspective with infinite potentials waiting to be tapped in every human being. Your participation and solidarity in celebrating diversity shall go a long way in further propelling an inclusive culture for all.

SUB-THEMES:  Interdisciplinary Approach for Mental Health Services & Psychosocial Wellbeing.  Implementation of the RPWD ACT 2016…Challenges, Provisions and Practices  Mental Health: Concept, Intervention and Good Practices  Policy Issues in Access to Education, Safety and Health at all Levels  Co-Morbidities in Persons with Disabilities  Delivery of Services, Challenges, Lessons Learnt (CBR Services Model)  Practitioners’ Voices through Success Stories and Issues in Guidance and Counseling  Breaking stigma through awareness and attitude building  Certification Issues and Implementation  Addressing socio-cultural context in shaping human behaviour  Developing resource centers and community support units  Good Practices Model of School Mental Health Promotion

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FINAL BROCHURE CRE (2)

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INTERNATIONAL PĀLI CONFERENCE
March 31 – April 01, 2020
The Compassionate message of Lord Buddha

About the Conference Venue

Lumbini Buddhist University, Lumbini (Nepal) : From the birthplace of Gautam Buddha, it is the autonomous and public institution of higher learning committed with the mission to educate the people of Nepal and enrich the global learning community through the application of core Buddhist values and to promote the World Peace.

Important Dates

Last Date for submission of Abstract : Feb 03, 2020

Last Date for submission of Full Paper : March 02, 2020

Contact Details

📧 palidivaso@gmail.com rprasadpali@gmail.com ktpp483@gmail.com

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Brochure-for-Pali-Conference-2020

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